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On Queering Latinx Art

A conversation between Vick Quezada and art historian Alexis Salas examining queer ways of analyzing Latinx art at the intersection of indigeneity, the Anthropocene, spirituality and new modes of resistance. The conversation will revolve around notions of art and queer kinship.

For more information about this event, click here.

Alexis Salas is an art historian of global modern and contemporary art. Salas is finishing a Ph.D. in Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art at the University of Texas at Austin with a dissertation titled “Disparity at Play: The Artists’ Projects of Temístocles 44 (Mexico City, 1991-2003).” Salas holds an M.A. in Art History from the University of Chicago, a B.A. in Art History and Spanish-Language Literature from Amherst College, and has studied at Universität der Künste Berlin and California Institute of the Arts. Salas has been a recipient of the Jacob Javits Fellowship, Fulbright Fellowship, the DAAD Fellowship and several awards to conduct research, teach, and lecture in Latin America, Europe, and North America.

Vick Quezada’s works (they/ them) queers the archaeological. Quezada’s projects explore the material histories and consciousness of Indigenous-Latinx hybridity within Western culture. They use a variety of mediums including sculpture, photography, video, and performances embodying ancient Nahuan rites to simultaneously make the obscured visible. Their artifacts delineate inherent systems of power and subjectivity in the Americas while transgressing “official” historical accounts. Quezada’s incorporation of natural elements, such as soil and flora, reference Indigenous beliefs that all beings are interconnected; that spirit earth and the cosmology are one.

This event is free & open to the public. Venue is wheelchair accessible.

For more information, please contact the NYU Latinx Project at LatinxProject@nyu.edu.

Facebook event page here.

Organized by the NYU Latinx Project; co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality at NYU.

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